A book report on the rime of the ancient mariner by samuel taylor coleridge

With sloping masts and dipping prow, As who pursued with yell and blow Still treads the shadow of his foe, And forward bends his head, The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, And southward aye we fled. And the bay was white with silent light, Till rising from the same, Full many shapes, that shadows were, In crimson colours came.

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As important as Coleridge was to poetry as a poet, he was equally important to poetry as a critic. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.

Besides the Rime of The Ancient Mariner, Coleridge composed the symbolic poem Kubla Khanwritten—Coleridge himself claimed—as a result of an opium dream, in "a kind of a reverie"; and the first part of the narrative poem Christabel.

He, after some fruitless attempts, at length, shot the Albatross, not doubting we should have a fair wind after it. Upon the whirl, where sank the ship, The boat spun round and round; And all was still, save that the hill Was telling of the sound. This influence can be seen in such critics as A.

For seven days and seven nights the Mariner endured the sight, and yet he was unable to die. And till my ghastly tale is told, This heart within me burns. However, the sailors change their minds when the weather becomes warmer and the mist disappears: The Mariner, Whalley suggests, is the poet.

And every tongue, through utter drought, Was withered at the root; We could not speak, no more than if We had been choked with soot.

The loud wind never reached the ship, Yet now the ship moved on! The cold sweat melted from their limbs, Nor rot nor reek did they: That thing is just an albatross around my neck.

Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea. I enjoyed the inestimable advantage of a very sensible, though at the same time, a very severe master [ As a result of these factors, Coleridge often failed to prepare anything but the loosest set of notes for his lectures and regularly entered into extremely long digressions which his audiences found difficult to follow.

That feeling described above changed from time to time. The ice did split with a thunder-fit; The helmsman steered us through! Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs, Upon the slimy sea. Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship, Yet she sailed softly too: I learnt from him, that Poetry, even that of the loftiest, and, seemingly, that of the wildest odes, had a logic of its own, as severe as that of science; and more difficult, because more subtle, more complex, and dependent on more, and more fugitive causes.

His poems directly and deeply influenced all the major poets of the age. And never a saint took pity on My soul in agony. This commentary is sometimes merely explanatory and now seems unnecessary but it may also shed further psychological light, as in the famous "moon gloss", with which my extract begins.

Alone, alone, all, all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea!

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Part V Oh sleep! This will be best explained by an instance or example. To have an albatross around your neck is to have a constant reminder of a big mistake you made. To him my tale I teach. According to Jerome McGann the poem is like a salvation story.

Part III There passed a weary time. A spring of love gushed from my heart, And I blessed them unaware: The sun, right up above the mast, Had fixed her to the ocean: It flung the blood into my head, And I fell down in a swound.

After relaying the story, the mariner leaves, and the wedding guest returns home, and wakes the next morning "a sadder and a wiser man".The epigram which Samuel Taylor Coleridge used to introduce "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" helps to convey two varying, but similarly related, ideas to the reader.

First, it addresses the enigmas of Nature and the stamina of ancient folklore and superstition surrounding it which tempts the reader into trivializing the overall beauty of the Reviews: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a classic poetry book from the pen of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In my interpretation, this seems to be the story of numerous zombie mariners, and the story of how they became the way they are, and the things that happened to them all afterwards/5.

The epigram which Samuel Taylor Coleridge used to introduce "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" helps to convey two varying, but similarly related, ideas to the reader. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a classic poetry book from the pen of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

In my interpretation, this seems to be the story of numerous zombie mariners, and the story of how they became the way they are, and the things that happened to them all afterwards/5. “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is written by Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

This poem was published in in the first edition of “Lyrical Ballads.” The running theme of the poem is resolution, as the Mariner pays heavily for his impulsive and cruel sin of killing an Albatross. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (text of ) By Samuel Taylor Coleridge About this Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge is the premier poet-critic of modern English tradition, distinguished for the scope and influence of his thinking about literature as much as for his innovative verse.

Active in the wake of the French Revolution as a dissenting.

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A book report on the rime of the ancient mariner by samuel taylor coleridge
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